Thought Leadership

Who are your end users?

Over the past several years we have had the opportunity to work with companies of various sizes as they plan and redesign their web presence. Some began using a CMS for the first time, while others were transitioning from either an open-source system (WP, Drupal, etc.) or some homegrown system to a more robust complete CMS solution (Adobe CQ5, Sitecore, Sharepoint, etc).

We’ve worked with these organizations to help them better understand the mental models of their “End Users” so that together we could design a system that is effective, efficient and satisfying. But who are these “End Users?” One common thread that we’ve noticed is that a majority of these organizations seemed to forget about a number of “end users” by focusing exclusively on the experience of visitors to their sites and their customers.

Don’t get us wrong, we think that it is vital to understand, and design towards the understanding of visitors and customers. We often create personas that help drive that design conversation.

What we are saying is that most of the organizations that we’ve worked with never completely thought about all of the user touch-points they need to consider.

Don’t let them know you can write code

There have been a few rumblings in the past year or so in the “twittersphere” from some noted UX professionals that as UX’ers we should learn programming. You may or may not agree with this in principle, but I would like to add this story to the mix. The “moral “to the story is that if you can code, don’t let them know!

Universal design ROCKS

We've blogged a bunch about the importance of Universal Design and how Responsive design isn't really any good. See http://theusabilitypeople.com/responsive-and-seven-principles-universal-...

Universal design is about creating something that will work across all user types, etc. while responsive design segregates users into different interactions depending the the type of device that they are using.

Affordances as perceived action possibilities

Have you ever walked up to a building and looked at the door and not known whether you should push or pull the door to get in? Have you ever pulled on a door only to find out that it was a “push” door?” Have you ever looked at a website or a web application and said to yourself, “Now what?”

5 Reasons We Love Usability Testing - by Justin Williams

User Experience and Usability Testing have become fashionable lingo in the health IT world, yet EHR software is rife with usability issues; convoluted workflows, poor content, and poor interaction design are common frustrations that plague providers daily. Changing healthcare reimbursement models, Meaningful Use, PQRS, ICD-10... don’t providers have enough concerns without having to worry about their EHR?

Should? or Must?

When signing up for a new account on a website, many sites often have very restrictive rules about the required characters for the password that you may choose, for example, this one:

Should

Usability is the new black -- Finally!

In a semi-recent blog post by Robert Fabricant (Jan 7, 2013) he calls User Experience “The new Black” borrowing the term from the fashion industry. ( see http://designmind.frogdesign.com/blog/user-experience-incorporated.html ).

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