Thought Leadership

Does Enterprise software have to be boring?

In the back of my mind I am thinking about the old apple commercial that talked about the differences between Mac’s and PC and that PC only came in beige.

(Ok so a quick search on YouTube found it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKjWmSOesPA )

Why is enterprise software so beige? Or so boring?

Wikipedia states: “Enterprise software, is software used in organizations, such as in a business or government,as opposed to software used by individuals.”

Responsive and Seven Principles of Universal Design

Most of us in the UX field understand that novice users, expert users, or disabled users all need to have equal access to the information and applications that the Internet has to offer.

Don't look for a flying unicorn that can sing, write code, and do UX

Scan any job-posting site to see what a mess the Usability and User Experience (UX) world has got itself into. Job titles such as User experience researcher, user researcher, user experience designer, usability specialist, human factors expert, interaction designer, information architect, user experience expert, user experience architect, user interface designer create an alphabet soup that make it difficult for recruiters to know which candidates are right for which positions.

“OK-Cancel” or “Cancel-OK?” How about both!

For the majority of my career I have worked on enterprise class software applications and websites that were built on, built for, and built with the Microsoft Windows operating system. Dialog boxes (and other user interactions), in this environment typically have an “OK-Cancel” at the bottom.

One Size DOES NOT fit all

I was at a presentation the other day where a developer was presenting some training related to a new web application that they have created. Many of the screens he showed reminded me of one of the many sayings that I’ve used a lot in my UX career, “One size does not fit all.”

Does the name Pavlov ring a bell? Some thoughts on Feature Carousels

There has been a lot of conversation recently on the “twittersphere” about feature carousels and how much we either love them or hate them.

“Feature Carousels,” are those those semi scrolling images that sequence through several images and/or marketing content that your website is promoting. These are a way to highlight some goods or services that your company is presenting. Personally I am pretty neutral, when done right, they can be a useful part of a companies web presence.

Making error messages less error prone

One of the easiest ways to improve the usability (and perceived usability) of a web application is to improve the text that appears on the screen specifically around labels, embedded assistance and error messages.

In many web applications, there is a false assumption that all of the users are already experts. In many situations, the placement of a simple bit of embedded assistance will help the novice and intermediate users know exactly what to do.

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